Referee

Become a Referee

Become a Referee

Interested in becoming certified volleyball referee or want to pursue your certification at a higher level?

First, read below for the qualifications required to become a certified referee.

Secondly, for local, provincial clinic dates and locations, contact your Provincial/Territorial Association. Regional (Indoor only), national and international clinic information can be obtained by contacting officials@volleyball.ca.

Volleyball referees in Canada are governed by policies set forth by VC through the National Referee Committee which in turn works in close co-operation with Regional Officials' Chairpersons (ROCs) in each Region of the Association.

Becoming a Referee (Indoor and/or Beach)

Local (Indoor and Beach)

In order to become a "LOCAL" volleyball referee, an individual proceeds as follows:

  • Studies and learns the rules of the game;
  • Avails himself/herself to call practice games and matches between school, club or other teams, in order to gain some practical experience;
  • Attends a referees' clinic sponsored by the Regional Association;
  • Successfully completes written and practical examinations.

If successful, the official is rated as a "LOCAL" Referee and should make himself/herself available to officiate different types of volleyball matches as frequently as possible.

Provincial (Indoor and Beach)

The next level of officiating is the provincial level, which entails the following:

  • Being active as a local referee for at least one full season.
  • Participating in a provincial referees' clinic and successfully completing written and practical examination.

Regional (Indoor Only)

The next stage of qualification of an indoor referee is a "REGIONAL" Referee, which entails the following:

  • Being active as a Provincial Referee for at least one full season;
  • Attending an advanced official's clinic for upgrading;
  • Written and practical examination for a Regional referee's certificate;
  • Approval by National Officials' Committee.

If successful, the official is rated as a "REGIONAL' Referee of VC.

National (Indoor)

The next level is qualification is as a "NATIONAL" Referee, which requires:

  • Being active as a Regional Referee for at least three years;
  • Recommendations of the Regional Officials' Chairperson for upgrading, based on activity, qualification and personal abilities;
  • Keeping the National Referee Committee advised of assignments at major tournaments as specified.
  • Attending designated clinics conducted by certified Course Conductors;
  • Submitting to a written and practical examination administered by the National Referee Committee at a major competition recognized for this purpose;
  • Approval by National Referee Committee.

If successful, the official is rated as a "NATIONAL' Referee of VC. To maintain this status, the official must remain active and submit for re-evaluation at regular intervals, as prescribed by VC's National Referee Committee.

Additional information and details on procedures and requirements for becoming a certified indoor volleyball official may be secured from the Regional Officials' Chairperson or from the National Referee Committee Chairperson.

National (Beach)

The next level is qualification as a beach national referee, which requires:

  • Being active as a provincial referee for at least three years; or
  • Being active as certified national indoor referee and being active as a provincial beach referee for at least one year, which must include at least one experience on the Canadian Beach Tour events.
  • Approval by the Regional Officials Chairperson, the National Beach Referee Committee and the National Referee Chairperson.
  • Participating in a national clinic and successfully completing written and practical examinations at a major competition recognized for this purpose.

If successful, the referee is rated as a “NATIONAL” referee of Volleyball Canada. To maintain this status, the referee must remain active and submit for re-evaluation at regular intervals, as prescribed by Volleyball Canada's National Referee Committee. 

International

The highest qualification for a referee is the "INTERNATIONAL" rating. The requirements include:

  • Being active as a National Referee for a number of years;
  • Recommendation of the National Referee Chairperson for upgrading, based on activity, qualification and personal abilities;
  • Attending a ten day International Referees' Course;
  • Submitting to written and practical examinations administered by a member of the International Referee Commission;
  • Satisfactory officiating as first Referee, under observation, of seven international matches, within three years of the Referees' Course;
  • Has not reached his/her 41st birthday (Indoor)

If successful, the referee is rated as an international referee of the FIVB.

Becoming a Sitting Referee

At this time, Volleyball Canada does not have a domestic program in place for Sitting Volleyball. The hope of the National Referee Committee is to have a strategic plan created to better service the sitting volleyball community in Canada. Volleyball Canada will work to offer a development opportunity to those interested in becoming a certified sitting referee every 3 years (with the big national events).

Internationally, there does however exist a development structure to certify International Referees. World Paravolley (WPV) is responsible for all Sitting Referees. Their main requirements include:

  • Already being an active qualified able-bodied National Referee in Canada
  • Successfully completing the WPV International Referee Course
  • Not having reached your 45th birthday on the first day of the WPV Course

Paravolley Pan Am includes all referees officiating for events in North Central and South America.

For more information, please email officials@volleyball.ca.

Female Referee Development

Useful Links
FIVB Female Referee Course

Facebook Page:  The Facebook group is a way for all female officials from coast to coast to connect and communicate.
Blog: This blog will be fully accessible for anyone interested in the development of female officials in Canada.
CAAWS: Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity

On a knowledge level of refereeing, women referees are as good as men, but unfortunately on a social level, they don’t get the same support. It’s a political problem, that’s why we have to integrate female referees in big international competitions.

Wei Jizhong — Former FIVB President
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Referee Engagement Program - Funding Partner

Ontario Trillium Foundation